A Recent Mobile Optimization Data Set Example

It blows my mind that many fantastic websites and companies have yet to embrace mobile optimization. A couple of months ago I discussed (in this post) my recent studies on mobile conversion optimization. I had recently spent time learning and then putting to use the mobile optimization skills that I had learned on my company’s website. The results are in and they are more than I had initially hoped for.

Prior to the mobile responsive redesign (and yes, responsive is the only way to go – not a mobile subdomain) we had put some lead gen mechanisms in place that made mobile / tablet conversion, and desktop conversion for that matter, a touch more easy. So the 60 days post adding those lead gen mechanisms we saw an increase of about 20% across the board on both desktop and mobile / tablet. I was pleased, obviously.

Post Mobile Optimization
Here is where it gets good… We designed the site around the mobile experience first, and then adjusted the desktop user interface to meet those demands. Most mobile experts will tell you this is the way to come at your design, think mobile first, desktop on the backend.we were able to incorporate mobile best practices, without overthrowing the desktop side. In fact, in doing so, it appears as though we slightly improved the desktop experience, probably because of a ease of use factor.

In the first 60 days post mobile optimization we saw an increase in desktop conversion of around 30%, that’s excellent, especially considering desktop is still the majority of my traffic. BUT, on the mobile side of traffic, we saw an increase in conversion of 100%, it doubled! But thats not all…

Mobile Versus Tablet
Here is where it gets even sweeter!

The mobile conversions I was referring to above is a combination of mobile (primarily cell phone) traffic and tablet traffic. When you break down the numbers a little further, the picture gets a little prettier.

In the 60 days post mobile responsive redesign, we experienced a percent increase in tablet traffic of about 100% and a percent increase in mobile (again, primarily cell phone) of 425%, yes, 425%!! This increase brought mobile (cell phone) conversions up to almost the exact same percentage as tablet conversions. So obviously, the new, responsive design, combined with some of the mobile conversion best practices I had wanted to try, really worked on the much smaller screens of cell phone users. Getting a cell phone user to convert into a lead at this new rate was something I was really proud of.

Now, that alone sounds pretty great right? but wait, there is more… Mobile (cell phone) traffic is a number that is about 4X tablet traffic. So this increase in converting the mobile / cell phone user has meant huge things to our lead flow. So far the sales conversion side has been status quo as well, so all in all, great things came from this investment.

Advertisements

Engaging and Converting the Mobile User

Obviously, mobile web visitors makes up a widely growing base of overall visitors for many websites in many fields. Over the course of the last 12 months or so I started to pay close attention to mobile traffic on my website. I was watching the analytics closely, looking for sources, looking for conversion trends, looking at multi-channel attribution conversion trends, looking at overall conversion. I found nothing too stunning to say the least, except for these things.

1) The traffic looked very similar to traditional, non-mobile traffic. Sources, keywords, channels, landing pages, paths, etc., all very similar.

2) The traffic converted into a lead at approximately 50% the rate of traditional, non-mobile traffic. – WHOA, OPPORTUNITY!!!!

Item number 1 above has much to do with the industry I’m in. I have read reports to the contrary in many fields, but the industry I operate in and the way I choose to acquire my traffic leads to a user with a little more cut and dry purpose.

Item #2 is clearly the piece that grabbed the heck out of my attention and made dig in, much much more. I love discoering new opportunities for more leads, it excites me. Clearly, we could stand to make that number significantly better.

I immediately started my research and reached out to friends who I thought knew a thing or two about mobile marketing. Turns out, mobile marketing is pretty stinkin new in the grand scheme of all things marketing channel related. There aren’t many that know a whole lot about it. A friend of mine from college, however, is an expert in the field, and a bit of a thought leader in the space. In fact, he was one of the creators of Google’s Mobile Marketing Playbook, his name is Mark Hendrix. Mark was extremely helpful [Thanks man!].

Through my research I found many things that looked similar but different about the user interface and conversion strategy.  The mobile user needs different mechanisms laid out slightly differently with different methods of access than the traditional user. Creating the user interface on the mobile side of your site requires you to segment the mobile users even further than norm. Obviously, I can’t get too in depth about this because my competitors may be reading, but engaging the mobile user requires more than just a mobile responsive website (some people choose the mobile subdomain for their website, that’s way lame these days).

Engaging the Mobile User
– Take a brand first and foremost approach.
– Engage with calls to action / lead gen assets that are more comfortable in a mobile environment.
– Tell the mobile user more with easy access videos that define your product and your brand.
– Reduce copy on the mobile side that appears on the desktop side.
– Make related blog posts more accessible and make sharing via mobile device front and center (especially Twitter).
– Make following your Twitter (the most mobile friendly major social platform) account way easier!

Converting the Mobile User
– Reconsider your lead gen assets conversion approach (I basically took a whole new, internal, simplified approach and am rolling it out to both mobile and non-mobile visitors). Since the mobile user is much more likely to be turned away by multi-step conversion mechanisms, simplify the process, remove the opt-in email or off site second steps. Again, you are talking about a new non-traditional approach to conversion on your lead gen assets, it may be more difficult to set up, but worth the conversions.
– Choose lead gen asset / CTA’s that both fit the segment of the viewer based on landing page qualifications and fit your mobile segment. Not all assets will apply in the same manner as they do to non-mobile traffic. Easy targeted white papers, infographics and high value quick download videos are great here.
– Present a lead gen asset / CTA at the start of your landing page and show the simplicity of accessing the asset. Presenting the asset at the start of your content, before the body, makes it more visible to the viewer and is likely the first impression it leaves. Ideally you have a mobile responsive site, so from a cell phone, the content of the landing page is viewed in a singular column (in most cases), give them 1) the header, 2) the lead gen asset and then 3) the body.

Mobile conversion is optimized when you present a clear lead gen asset / call to action immediately in the hot zone without scrolling and  you do so with simplicity. That process is obviously a little more complex for non-mobile traffic, more conversion optimization techniques like trust building etc. can be added to that equation. However, in mobile, you don’t often have that luxury in many cases. If you take that approach, even as the user scrolls, they will know where to find what they want. Since a mobile responsive site pushes everything in one column, your call to action may get lost at the very bottom and that simply won’t cut it (unless you are my competitor).

So there you have it, engage and convert mobile users requires a little different thinking. Until next time!